Broken Bone (Open)

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Broken Bone (Open)
Overall:

When a bone itself is damaged in such a way that it is acctually broken into two or more pieces, and the pieces break the skin, the patient is in possession of a Closed Broken Bone.

Common symptoms include Pain and Laceration. Angulation of the Bone might also occur, but is not present in all cases.

Notes:

This condition has the potential to cause permanent lameness.

Related Herbs: Alder, Broom, Chervil, Chickweed, Comfrey, Coriander, Daisy, Dandelion, Goldenrod, Hawthorn, Horsetail, Kit's Ear, Little Daisy, Marigold, Mouse, Poppy, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Willow,
Related Symptoms: Inflammation, Pain,
Mild Cases
Details:

Mild breaks involve one break in the bone, with no separation between the two halves. (This is rare in an open break)

Duration: Approximately 2 moons.
Treatment:
  • Medicate the patient, as this process can be painful.
  • Palpate the bone to check that it is properly aligned. If it is not, do what is necessary to align in by pushing and pulling with paws and mouth. (In mild cases little alignment should be necessary)
  • Cleanse and apply appropriate herbs to the open wound, bandaging it if necessary.
  • Keep the patient immobilized for at least 1 moon.
  • Begin evaluating the patient frequently, watching as healing progresses. Short walks might be taken (under supervision) if healing is progressing well during the final period of rest.
  • The first half to full moon following the patients return to duty should be with caution, to ensure that the bone is not re-damaged, and to make a full evaluation of any permanent damage.
Residual Effects:

Weakness of the break site for a half to full moon.
High probability of temporary lameness.
Low probability of permanent lameness.

Complications:

High potential for damaging the same bone again if enough healing time is not taken.
Low potential for permanent damage to mobility.

Moderate Cases
Details:

Moderate breaks involve either multiple breaks (with large enough pieces to restore the bone into shape) or displacement (a gap between the two halves) of the fracture.

Duration: Approximately 2-3 moons.
Treatment:
  • Medicate the patient, as this process can be painful.
  • Palpate the bone to check that it is properly aligned. If it is not, do what is necessary to align in by pushing and pulling with paws and mouth. (In moderate cases alignment is likely to be necessary)
  • Cleanse and apply appropriate herbs to the open wound, bandaging it if necessary.
  • Keep the patient immobilized for at least 2 moons.
  • Begin evaluating the patient frequently, watching as healing progresses. Short walks might be taken (under supervision) if healing is progressing well during the final period of rest.
  • The first moon following the patients return to duty should be with caution, to ensure that the bone is not re-damaged, and to make a full evaluation of any permanent damage.
Residual Effects:

Weakness of the break site for a full moon.
High probability of temporary lameness.
Moderate probability of permanent lameness.

Complications:

High potential for damaging the same bone again if enough healing time is not taken.
Moderate potential for permanent damage to mobility.

Severe Cases
Details:

Sever breaks involve a combination of multiple breaks and displacement, OR a bone so crushed their is little hope of it being put back into order.

Duration: Approximately 3-6 moons.
Treatment:
  • Medicate the patient, as this process can be painful.
  • Palpate the bone to check that it is properly aligned. If it is not, do what is necessary to align in by pushing and pulling with paws and mouth. (In severe cases alignment is likely to be necessary, but has the potential to be difficult or near impossible)
  • Cleanse and apply appropriate herbs to the open wound, bandaging it if necessary.
  • Keep the patient immobilized for at least 3 moons.
  • Begin evaluating the patient frequently, watching as healing progresses. Short walks might be taken (under supervision) if healing is progressing well during the final period of rest. (This might be as long as 3 moons)
  • The first two moons following the patients return to duty should be with caution, to ensure that the bone is not re-damaged, and to make a full evaluation of any permanent damage.
Residual Effects:

Weakness of the break site for at least 2 moons.
High probability of temporary lameness.
High probability of permanent lameness.

Complications:

High potential for damaging the same bone again if enough healing time is not taken.
High potential for permanent damage to mobility.