Dislocated hip

DISCLAIMER: The information provided herein is in relation to a role playing game based on a fictional book series. None of the information provided herein should be used to treat yourself or your pets. Please consult someone trained in first aid, Human Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, or another appropriate professional before attempting to treat a living creature.
Dislocated hip
Overall:

A dislocated shoulder happens in the event when the ball of the hip join is removed from the cup of the hip, stretching the tendons that normally hold it in place. It is typically characterized by severe pain and inflammation in addition to the joint separation. The circumstances of the injury might also cause additional symptoms to present themselves.

Notes:

This condition has a high probability of re-injury.
This condition applies administrator controlled re-injury rules to the character.
This condition causes complications when giving birth

Related Herbs: Broom, Colt's Foot, Coriander, Daisy, Horsetail, Little Daisy, Poppy, Rosemary, Willow,
Related Symptoms: Inflammation, Pain, Severe Pain,
Mild Cases
Details:

A dislocated hip is considered mild when the joint and the socket do not completely separate and the ball sits loosely in the socket.

Duration: A half-moon without movement, a half moon of light movement, (Minimum of) 2 moons of light duty.
Treatment:

CAUTION – Herbs for pain should be kept minimal. Over-treating the pain symptom can result in the cat being unaware of the damage they are causing themselves.

  • The hip must be forcibly returned to the socket. This is best done by having one cat restrain the torso of the patient while another pulls on the leg and a third uses their paws to guide the joint back together (it should be noted that incidental lacerations and puncture wounds are possible due to the amount of force needed and should be treated after the leg is set). The hip is notoriously difficult to reset and this procedure might take far more time than setting a shoulder.
  • Restrict the patient to the Medicine Den with no movement for a minimum of a half-moon.
  • Careful introduce light movement after the course of a half-moon. Overdoing things as this phase will result in the loose tendons failing to keep the joint in the socket and the hip separating again.
  • Return the patient to duty carefully, starting as lightly as possible and slowly upping the stress, returning the patient to lighter duty at any sign of strain or potential re-seperation.
Residual Effects:

Temporary lameness.
Medium probability of permanent lameness.

Complications:
  • High potential for repeat injury (75% probability for re-injury, dropping 5% each week that passes, and stopping at 10%, to be rolled each time the character engages in strenuous activity like running.
  • After 2 years without re-injury the probability goes to just 1%)
  • Moderate potential for birthing problems (add 30% during first 2 years within re-injury, 15% thereafter)
Moderate Cases
Details:

A dislocated hip is considered moderate when the joint and the socket fully separate but the ball stays aligned to the socket.

Duration: A three-quarters of a moon without movement, a three-quarters of a moon of light movement, (Minimum of) 3 moons of light duty.
Treatment:

CAUTION – Herbs for pain should be kept minimal. Over-treating the pain symptom can result in the cat being unaware of the damage they are causing themselves.

  • The hip must be forcibly returned to the socket. This is best done by having one cat restrain the torso of the patient while another pulls on the leg and a third uses their paws to guide the joint back together (it should be noted that incidental lacerations and puncture wounds are possible due to the amount of force needed and should be treated after the leg is set). The hip is notoriously difficult to reset and this procedure might take far more time than setting a shoulder.
  • Restrict the patient to the Medicine Den with no movement for a minimum of a three-quarters of a moon.
  • Careful introduce light movement after the course of three-quarters of a moon. Overdoing things as this phase will result in the loose tendons failing to keep the joint in the socket and the hip separating again.
  • Return the patient to duty carefully, starting as lightly as possible and slowly upping the stress, returning the patient to lighter duty at any sign of strain or potential re-seperation.
Residual Effects:

Temporary lameness.
High probability of permanent lameness.

Complications:
  • High potential for repeat injury (85% probability for re-injury, dropping 5% each week that passes, and stopping at 10%, to be rolled each time the character engages in strenuous activity like running.
  • After 2 and 1/2 years without re-injury the probability goes to just 1%)
  • Moderate potential for birthing problems (add 40% during first 2 and 1/2 years within re-injury, 20% thereafter)
Severe Cases
Details:

A dislocated hip is considered severe when the joint and the socket completely separate and do not remain in alignment.

Duration: A moon without movement, A moon of light movement, (Minimum of) 4 moons of light duty.
Treatment:

CAUTION – Herbs for pain should be kept minimal. Over-treating the pain symptom can result in the cat being unaware of the damage they are causing themselves.

  • The hip must be forcibly returned to the socket. This is best done by having one cat restrain the torso of the patient while another pulls on the leg and a third uses their paws to guide the joint back together (it should be noted that incidental lacerations and puncture wounds are possible due to the amount of force needed and should be treated after the leg is set). The hip is notoriously difficult to reset and this procedure might take far more time than setting a shoulder.
  • Restrict the patient to the Medicine Den with no movement for a minimum of a moon.
  • Careful introduce light movement after the course of a moon. Overdoing things as this phase will result in the loose tendons failing to keep the joint in the socket and the hip separating again.
  • Return the patient to duty carefully, starting as lightly as possible and slowly upping the stress, returning the patient to lighter duty at any sign of strain or potential re-seperation.
Residual Effects:

Temporary lameness.
Near certainty of permanent lameness.

Complications:
  • High potential for repeat injury (95% probability for re-injury, dropping 5% each week that passes, and stopping at 10%, to be rolled each time the character engages in strenuous activity like running.
  • After 3 years without re-injury the probability goes to just 1%)
  • High potential for birthing problems (add 50% during first 3 years within re-injury, 25% thereafter)